Friday, 14 October 2016

Something Interesting Brewing in Spain.

Spain Hasn’t Had a Federal Government for the Last 9 Months and People Love It
This has created a possible climate for the UBUNTU Plan to take root in a small town and lead by example.
 
By Derrick Broze, The AntiMedia - Waking Times Media
Although Spain can hardly be called a stateless society as it is now, it is certainly providing an example of what people will do when the State cannot — or will not — help the people.

For more than nine months, Spain has existed without a traditional national government. In the face of this lack of central authority and planning, Spaniards have done the impossible: they have survived without a government.

The New York Times recently reported on this phenomenon:
“After two gruelling national elections in six months, and with a third vote possible in December, no party has won enough seats or forged the coalition needed to form a government. For the first time in Spain’s four decades as a modern democracy, this country of 47 million people has a caretaker government.”
Spanish politicians warned the people that allowing the national government to fade away could have disastrous effects. However, as the New York Times notes, “the crisis seems to have offered a glimpse of life if politicians simply stepped out of the way. For many here, it has not been all that bad.”

“No government, no thieves,” Félix Pastor, a language teacher, told the Times. Pastor said the people of Spain were better without a government because the politicians were unable to cause any more harm. Rafael Navarro, a 71-year old pharmacy owner in Madrid, told the Times that “Spain would be just fine if we got rid of most of the politicians and three-fourths of government employees.”

Despite the lack of government at the moment, life goes on without interruption. Welfare recipients in Spain are still receiving their benefits, and basic government employees are still paid. The streets are not littered with trash, and public trains and buses continue to operate.
However, there are some major differences from life with a national government. Spain has been unable to pass national legislation, handle foreign affairs, or fund new government projects. This means no new invasive, authoritarian laws can be passed by corrupt government officials.

Of course, local governments are still capable of creating projects that will benefit their local communities. Santiago Lago Peñas, an economics professor in the Galicia region of northwest Spain, told the Times that “[f]or a Spanish citizen, the most relevant government is the regional one.” While it is always possible for corruption to exist, even within a local “government” or council, communities are more able to combat dangerous behavior from smaller, local institutions.

The beauty of the situation in Spain is that most of the public seems perfectly content to continue on without a national government. “Only 2.3 percent of respondents in a July poll by Spain’s Center for Sociological Investigations considered the lack of government the country’s major problem,” Vox recently reported.
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